Lost question + stuff

  • May. 23rd, 2008 at 11:10 PM
janie_tangerine: (1984)
Lost question because I can't re-watch any of S2 right now and I can't find the information anywhere.. does anyone remember whether the regular hatch door (not the one they blew up, the back one) could be opened from the outside or from the inside only? It doesn't change what I'm planning with it either way but I just can't remember and if I have to write a bunny which shouldn't even exist I figure I can do it properly ;)

random stuff + some observations on King's 'The Stand' after sort of re-reading it not too scientifically five years after the first time )

Lost question + stuff

  • May. 23rd, 2008 at 11:10 PM
janie_tangerine: (1984)
Lost question because I can't re-watch any of S2 right now and I can't find the information anywhere.. does anyone remember whether the regular hatch door (not the one they blew up, the back one) could be opened from the outside or from the inside only? It doesn't change what I'm planning with it either way but I just can't remember and if I have to write a bunny which shouldn't even exist I figure I can do it properly ;)

random stuff + some observations on King's 'The Stand' after sort of re-reading it not too scientifically five years after the first time )

I need a Real Hume icon for realz.

  • May. 13th, 2008 at 7:32 PM
janie_tangerine: (OMGWTF)
Please bear with my spamming today.

So I'm reading the feminist interpretations of Hume and I was at this article written by the same author that wrote the one I have to essay about and... well, I'll just copy that.

The celebrated laments in the conclusion of book one of the Treatise might be read as the expression of a member of a subject race, the Scots, who had just lost their independence. Hume - speaking English with a despised Scottish accent, writing English with awareness of his own deaf ear for his own lapses into 'Scotticisms', hoping for an audience with a readership who did not treat him really as one of them - might also be seen to have been in a position a bit like that of a woman trying to make her way in a profession where she is suspect from the start, a 'strange uncouth monster' unlikely to win acceptance from those already securely in possession of whatever 'thrones' might exist there. Admittedly, whatever Hume thought he was doing in this celebrated 'conclusion of this book' he surely did not think he was merely expressing a literary Scot's frustrations, let alone putting himself into women's shoes or sympathizing with the bluestockings of his day. [...] Hume was, if you like, an unwitting virtual woman.

Is it wrong that I find this too amusing for words? Wasn't there anyone on my FL saying that Des is a total damsel in distress? Well, seems like my professor here agrees ;) God I'm never going to be serious when discussing it. Never.

I need a Real Hume icon for realz.

  • May. 13th, 2008 at 7:32 PM
janie_tangerine: (OMGWTF)
Please bear with my spamming today.

So I'm reading the feminist interpretations of Hume and I was at this article written by the same author that wrote the one I have to essay about and... well, I'll just copy that.

The celebrated laments in the conclusion of book one of the Treatise might be read as the expression of a member of a subject race, the Scots, who had just lost their independence. Hume - speaking English with a despised Scottish accent, writing English with awareness of his own deaf ear for his own lapses into 'Scotticisms', hoping for an audience with a readership who did not treat him really as one of them - might also be seen to have been in a position a bit like that of a woman trying to make her way in a profession where she is suspect from the start, a 'strange uncouth monster' unlikely to win acceptance from those already securely in possession of whatever 'thrones' might exist there. Admittedly, whatever Hume thought he was doing in this celebrated 'conclusion of this book' he surely did not think he was merely expressing a literary Scot's frustrations, let alone putting himself into women's shoes or sympathizing with the bluestockings of his day. [...] Hume was, if you like, an unwitting virtual woman.

Is it wrong that I find this too amusing for words? Wasn't there anyone on my FL saying that Des is a total damsel in distress? Well, seems like my professor here agrees ;) God I'm never going to be serious when discussing it. Never.

couple of Sunday book recs

  • May. 11th, 2008 at 4:26 PM
janie_tangerine: (steinbeck - mice and man [sawyer])
I had read the fist of these during the Barcelona trip and the second, the last three days. And since I want to vary my entries' content.. ;) Of course they couldn't be more different from each other.


Oh, and the Italian translations for the S3 Lost episodes are downright hilarious. What the hell does Flashes Before Your Eyes have to do with Dejà Vu? Because that's how they translated it. I don't think I'd have ever given it a minute of my attention had I watched it dubbed/in the Italian version first.

That said, I'll be back on the Hume and women thing. He wasn't even sexist. How do I love Hume? The real one, the real one.

couple of Sunday book recs

  • May. 11th, 2008 at 4:26 PM
janie_tangerine: (steinbeck - mice and man [sawyer])
I had read the fist of these during the Barcelona trip and the second, the last three days. And since I want to vary my entries' content.. ;) Of course they couldn't be more different from each other.


Oh, and the Italian translations for the S3 Lost episodes are downright hilarious. What the hell does Flashes Before Your Eyes have to do with Dejà Vu? Because that's how they translated it. I don't think I'd have ever given it a minute of my attention had I watched it dubbed/in the Italian version first.

That said, I'll be back on the Hume and women thing. He wasn't even sexist. How do I love Hume? The real one, the real one.
janie_tangerine: (OMGWTF)
Thing is, for my class of Moral Philosophy (for which I have to take two exams) I have to make a sort of small thesis giving the second exam. Which isn't anything too crazy since I only have to find an article in English, summarize it and do a relation about it. Now, I could do it either about Hobbes, Locke or Hume. Goes unsaid that I picked Hume (and not for entirely shallow reasons, he's my favorite of the three anyways) and don't ask me why but I ended up deciding to do it about an essay he did where he talked about women's condition. Problem is, I have to bring three or four articles to choose from and on the net I could find only one. Result: I spent five hours in the library this morning going through an index of all the English philosophical publications in various philosophy magazines from 1971 until 2002 searching for articles about Hume and women and feminism and stuff. What's the funny thing about that?

At one point I was more or less around 1988 and I find an article in the index. Titled Time Travel and Panormal. Then after staring at it for five minutes, I go to the end where there was a recap of what the article was about and I find out that it said that for Hume time travel was pure nonsense. But it was written in response to someone that said the contrary, aka that Hume said that time travel could happen.

Now, the point isn't that the guy who wrote the response was right because the real Hume would have said that it was pure idiocy. The point is that it was damn hilarious. If only it wasn't an effort of epic proportions to get the librarian to fish out those two magazines I'd totally get a kick out of reading that stuff. I mean, Hume and time travel.

And now I'm back there to actually discuss the feminism/women stuff, hoping he's alright with it. Also because after finding four articles on the matter from 1971 to 2002 I'm not too eager to start again.
janie_tangerine: (OMGWTF)
Thing is, for my class of Moral Philosophy (for which I have to take two exams) I have to make a sort of small thesis giving the second exam. Which isn't anything too crazy since I only have to find an article in English, summarize it and do a relation about it. Now, I could do it either about Hobbes, Locke or Hume. Goes unsaid that I picked Hume (and not for entirely shallow reasons, he's my favorite of the three anyways) and don't ask me why but I ended up deciding to do it about an essay he did where he talked about women's condition. Problem is, I have to bring three or four articles to choose from and on the net I could find only one. Result: I spent five hours in the library this morning going through an index of all the English philosophical publications in various philosophy magazines from 1971 until 2002 searching for articles about Hume and women and feminism and stuff. What's the funny thing about that?

At one point I was more or less around 1988 and I find an article in the index. Titled Time Travel and Panormal. Then after staring at it for five minutes, I go to the end where there was a recap of what the article was about and I find out that it said that for Hume time travel was pure nonsense. But it was written in response to someone that said the contrary, aka that Hume said that time travel could happen.

Now, the point isn't that the guy who wrote the response was right because the real Hume would have said that it was pure idiocy. The point is that it was damn hilarious. If only it wasn't an effort of epic proportions to get the librarian to fish out those two magazines I'd totally get a kick out of reading that stuff. I mean, Hume and time travel.

And now I'm back there to actually discuss the feminism/women stuff, hoping he's alright with it. Also because after finding four articles on the matter from 1971 to 2002 I'm not too eager to start again.

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